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An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of

An Entrepreneurial

An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of

An Entrepreneurial
An Entrepreneurial

With increasing globalization, people have seen the need to increase the creation of wealth, especially in the

backward Third World.

necessary employment opportunities without constant effort and partnership between all sectors of the economy.

One way to create job opportunities is to develop business and modern skills within the country. Creating such

An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of

employment opportunities by encouraging entrepreneurial innovation is well illustrated by Dana, Korot and Tostiga

(2005: 12) in Silicon Valley, Israel, Singapore, and the Netherlands. The authors report that there are 6,500

technology enterprises in the 35-mile-by-10-mile corridor within Silicon Valley. Singapore is home to approximately

100,000 business people and had a per capita GDP of ، 42,948.00 in 2004 and an annual growth rate of 8.8% (Singapore Statistics, 2006).

 

astonishing 3% (Grindling and Steinberg, 2006: 5). With the growing interest in business innovation as an economic

driver, there is a need to specialize in this area.

An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of

Dana, etc. (2005: 10)

defines knowledge as “the integration of information, ideas, experiences, intuition, skills, and lessons learned that

creates additional value for the firm”.

empower students. They establish themselves within a modern business culture. To serve as an engine for

problem statement

The research question under discussion is what are the minimum requirements in the framework of business and

innovation to support the creation of business and innovative knowledge in higher education institutions?

the aim.

An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of

This article seeks to develop a framework for encouraging business thinking in higher education environments,

taking into account policy and infrastructure requirements, basic creative principles, and institutional arrangements.

Policy interference

Policy measures within higher education institutions are necessary to establish guidance for entrepreneurs, funding From the point of

capital gains tax rates, incentives to increase spending on research and development, and encourage active

venture capital markets. Incentives, a change to recruit and dismiss labor regulations, and encourage spending on

new technology shares (Da Ren, Nicodano and Symbenelli, 2005: 8).

Higher Education Institution Policies

An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of

The higher education institution must provide a conducive working environment in which entrepreneurship can

flourish. Venkataraman (2003: 154) suggests that it is not just the injection of capital that drives business growth.

These extraordinary things include access to

new ideas, informal forums, role models, region-specific opportunities, access to major markets, safety nets, and

executive leadership.

An Entrepreneurial Development Framework for Institutions of Establish Technology Licensing

Offices (TLOs) in higher education institutions. Stanford University-sponsored research raised ڈالر 391 million,

creating 25 TLO startups in 1997 (Gregorio and Shane, 2003: 209). Invest in a patent rig.

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