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The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

Bring in the

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

who will lead the way from here is a social entrepreneur. Solopreneurs aren’t new, but they’re growing from the

horrific manifestations of Enrons, Tyco’s, and Worldcom’s; internal trade and accounting scandals; excessive salaries

of the CEO, unfair practices of the financial industry, and all other obvious manifestations of corporate greed.

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the
The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

Solopreneurs, also called social entrepreneurs, have a similar impetus as other entrepreneurs: they are also

determined to be successful and deserve a decent life, and they also focus on a mission that goes beyond the essence.

Their scope of care goes beyond the well-being of their families and themselves. Social entrepreneurs are different

from other entrepreneurs in caring for the well-being of their community. Their exploits usually stem from an

encounter with a worrying trend that everyone else ignores or takes for granted, even though it creates a longitudinal

and unfair disadvantage for some groups. In other words: social entrepreneurs focus on error correction.

The most famous social entrepreneur is Muhammad Yunus, a former professor of economics who founded Grameen

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

Bank in Bangladesh in response to the refusal of conventional banks to provide small loans to small entrepreneurs.

Yunus ’entrepreneurial project has become so successful that it has caught the attention of the world! In addition to

the fact that Grameen managed to prove that conventional banks are wrong because Grameen has a 98% return on

all its microloans and has helped many former poor people in Bangladesh to become decent micro-entrepreneurs,

Yunus has managed to divide its venture into other areas and they work with large yogurt and mobile phone

companies to deliver much-needed products to the people of Bangladesh. In addition, Yunus is so far the only

business person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and has inspired self-employed people from around the world to

pursue a similar purpose: to correct a mistake.

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

Solopreneur is not an entrepreneur who engages in philanthropy for social reasons. While donating for social

causes is certainly commendable and should definitely be continued, the difference between just donating for a social

purpose and being a social entrepreneur is that the entire survival of a social entrepreneur is based on a social cause.

Moreover, although philanthropists are usually wealthy individuals, a social entrepreneur is not necessarily.

So what material are social entrepreneurs made of? How do they stand out? What drives them? These are the seven

characteristics of social entrepreneurs:

They proactively expand their circle of influence to fulfill their circle of concern. It’s a concept based on the first of

Steven Covey’s seven habits for highly effective people from his blockbuster of the same title. Proactive people are

the ones who don’t wait until others do what needs to be done: take the initiative. Covey explains that we should try

to expand our circle of influence so that we can address more of our concerns. However, we must also accept our

limitations. Sociopreneurs go beyond their limits and try to expand their circle of influence even further than other

effective people.

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the
The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

They start with a thought at the end. This is the second of Covey’s seven habits. That means you need to think about

what you want people to say about you when your life is over, and then work on making it happen. Solopreneurs do

this instinctively. They work right, whether anyone recognizes it or not. They know in their hearts that their efforts

are honorable and that they will not regret starting them.

They think win-win-win. This trait stems from Covey’s fourth habit but is enriched with an additional layer of gains.

Covey’s fourth habit discusses the fact that traditional businessmen engage in a win-loss mindset: if I want to win,

you’re going to have to lose, and vice versa. Highly efficient people, Covey says, work together with a win-win

approach: both can win, but if that’s not possible, a deal is made. Social entrepreneurs go a step further.

The Second Decade of the 21st Century Is Here: Bring in the

They consider not only themselves and their colleague, but also the community and the environment: an integral

part of the “bigger picture”. Their arrangements are based on victory for you, me, and the wider community.

They want to understand first, then move into a higher gear. This was inspired by Covey’s fifth habit, “first try to

understand, then be understood.” Sociopreneurs know that the wait for understanding can take a long time.

If Mohammad Yunus had waited for anyone to understand his efforts to eradicate the appalling and unnecessary

poverty of the poor producers in Bangladesh, he would still have waited. So.

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