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The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap  An Inquisition Into
The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

Shooting basketball as a whole is a relatively simple easy move. Simple in appearance, complex in reality.

And it seems that as much as I understand myself and learn from self-knowledge and self-knowledge, I catch

shooting problems or contradictions that happen to shooters or players who think they are shooters all over the

world. (My definition of a shooter can score 90 from the free-throw line, and I mean 90/100 every time he hits 100.)

I was a regular shooter in the 90’s percentile in the early ’80s. He has been in the top 10 of the NCAA’s best

free-throwers since 1895. led the nation with 92.4% in 1972 while I played for Rex Junior College in Rexburg, Idaho

before playing in the Munich Olympics. Even at that time, I had good mechanics with a good touch, but I didn’t

understand why I was 20% better than the rest of the country, or why there were all sorts of problems in the rest of

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

the country instead.

It wasn’t until 1981 that I experienced a head-on collision with a concrete bridge on a frozen night on Utah’s national

streets that this “mystery” of the shooting average began to unravel. He remained in the hospital for about 10 days

and later went in a wheelchair for a couple. My whole right side was broken. My shooting arm was severed with a

compound fracture, my right shinbone had a compound fracture as well as 3 ribs and all on the right side.

But I was lucky to be alive.
At the time of the impact, I was wondering if my shooting arm was damaged and how it would affect my shooting ability.

Anyway, at least I didn’t go down without explaining myself first. After a while, I got bored watching TV soap and

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap  An Inquisition Into
The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

ESPN Sports was still not working. I would lie around and worry about the fact that I was a regular 94 free throw

shooter and could not understand why I would lose about 6% regularly. I started some basic shooting

movements from my wheelchair which was very strange and the reason was that I only had half my body to work.

Any great muscle power from the lower body was useless. But, it was time for a deep self-analysis of my shooting skills. I completely dissociated the whole body structure because it was related to the shooting process.

(Always shooting 100.) I thought to myself if I can make 1 FT, why can’t I make 2, 3, 4, 50, 100, 250, 500 ads.

Then it all came to me slowly. The forces of my thinking are in direct harmony with scientific principles and the laws

of nature. A major destructive factor that hurts good throw shooting is the criminal background movement of joints

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap  An Inquisition Into
The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

and muscles. This is the common dominator which is the most erroneous rule. In other words, I think it misses more than any other part of the release.

Then I came up with the idea of an “incomplete gap”, which led me to become more aware of free-throw shooting

techniques and mechanics. (IG) is the percentage of reduction (D) as compared to the percentage of

efficiency (E), or in some formula, it would look like this:

“IG” = ٪ E – ٪ D = Shooters IQ.

In other words, if you do an average of 72% (like the NBA), you have an incomplete difference of 28%. If you shoot

60/100, your IG is 40. Not too complicated but annoying if you are an honest player or coach. In my case, my IG was

6% at the age of 31 or just before my fatal accident.

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap  An Inquisition Into
The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

Now that you can understand your incomplete space or part of the shooter’s intelligence [I.Q]. Every player who

practices shooting is trying to lower their IG or improve their shooter’s IQ. Either way, most players don’t

know or understand the best points of a great shoot. They keep practicing what I call “comfort zone”. More on that later.

The first step in finding your IG is to start shooting 100 free throws, and from now on always shoot in groups of 100

to get a standard reference. Let’s say you hit 71/100, well that’s not a good sign because IG is big enough, and so

there’s a good chance of an error between 5-10. In other words of your other 100 shots, you can hit 68, third 100-73,

fourth 100-76, 5th, and last 100-65 hits.

The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

The Imperfect Gap  An Inquisition Into
The Imperfect Gap An Inquisition Into

If you follow a format like this, it tells me that your shooting mechanics have leveled or leveled the 70.3 plates (using

the 500 shots above). You will not be happy with this number so you practice more than 70.3% of your time.

Long practice will help some people but until a new mental approach and a complete understanding of mechanics

and responsibility for the movement of all parts of the body, your physical DNA or genetic make-up shooting

continues. Keep what I call your physical “comfort”. Zone “What does it mean?

You are on average 70.3% of the above hypothetical numbers. You have to have a mental point of view.

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